Peter did a great job for me with Dynamics CRM configuration and demonstration for a very successful proof-of-concept. He is calm, detailed and very knowledgeable.

Simon Shearston. Microsoft.

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8 steps to self sufficiency in CRM

What do I mean from self-sufficiency in CRM? Simply put, you as the client can use, configure and build on CRM technology without bringing in costly consultants. Why? Well cost is certainly one thing. However, the other is that external consultants rarely understand your business as well as you do. They will also have their own agenda and the mix often results in expectations not being realized. The more you, as the client, can do ‘CRM’ independently the more likely you will achieve success.

8 steps to self-sufficiency in CRM

What do I mean from self-sufficiency in CRM?

Simply put, you as the client can use, configure and build on CRM technology without bringing in costly consultants.

Why? Well cost is certainly one thing. However, the other is that external consultants rarely understand your business as well as you do. They will also have their own agenda and the mix often results in expectations not being realized. The more you, as the client, can do ‘CRM’ independently the more likely you will achieve success.

Here’s how:-

 

  1. Understand what CRM can provide your business with. For example, it isn’t a payroll or HR system. You could spend a lot of time building it to provide such functionality but there are pre-packed solutions out there (CRM and NON CRM) and you should be focusing all your efforts on the touch points with your prospects and customers.
  2. Know what your business needs from CRM and how you are going to measure the impact. CRM technology can bring efficiencies but you need to be able to demonstrate it.
  3. Establish a step by step plan for CRM going from the basics to the more complex. Break it down into bite size chunks and learn before moving to the next level.
  4. Start getting customer data into CRM early – even if it isn’t 100 clean and accurate, the very act of making the data more visible in CRM will encourage users to manage the data better.
  5. Start using CRM for core customer relationship activities as early as you can. This is as big a change as anything that CRM delivers and could deliver significant unexpected impacts.
  6. Get independent and experienced help and advice to build your skills across the team
  7. Get the whole team behind the plan and identify how their use of CRM will help them and the business
  8. Build slowly and steadily learning as you go – don’t try to build the perfect solution from day one – you will waste a lot of time and effort

 

Clearly, this model isn’t for everyone. In my experience, smaller and faster moving organisations benefit from this model more than large enterprise organisations. It can be tempting to try to use CRM to fix all your problems and issues – but doing this risks missing all the main benefits of a core CRM system and complicates the project more than it needs to do. That’s why CRMKnowledge offers mentoring solutions like CRMtrial2live and CRMMentor to help organisations get up and running with CRM fast and onto an independent footing as soon as possible. Check us out on www.crmknowledge.co.uk, tweet us @crmknowledgeUK or call Peter on 079801 75553.

 

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